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No Question Is A Dumb Question …. Except

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO, Sep 1, 2022.

  1. BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO

    BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO New Member

    8
    3
    Hello ,

    Finally got shop built and ready to start my adventure .
    Starting on one of my personal mounts it’s already wet tanned.

    When thawing best way to do so? Just lay out to thaw? Fridge? WAter ?

    How long can I work on it thawed ruffly before I glue it up? I Need to finish trimming areas and patching any cuts. . I want to take my time and I work full time 6 days a week . I figure 2-3 evenings after work I should be good to go.

    When you finish for night just roll back up in fridge ? Anything y’all long term guys recommend?


    Can you re freeze if needed again after thawing? Does this break down anything thaw freeze thaw freeze?


    Second ( not to do with thawing ) salt after fleshing , any salt y’all prefer over the next ?

    The class I had taken the deer was wet tanned prior Other then prep work before we set it on the form. Being 8-10hr days There I didn’t have to worry about thinking of this , nor did I think about this. My mistake.

    As always , appreciate the help
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2022
    Robert Baker likes this.
  2. TaxTheDeadLover

    TaxTheDeadLover Member

    41
    15
    USA
    I can only answer your first question lol since I’m not an expert but my mentor taught me to just lay out to defrost and then put in cold water for the last 10 minutes.
     

  3. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Are you starting a business?
     
  4. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    Ahh your all over the place here!
    Tanned capes or raw big difference
    Salt is salt but try not to use mineral rock salt.
     
    Robert Baker likes this.
  5. BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO

    BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO New Member

    8
    3
    I was questioning the tan capes at first part of my question about thawing not raw capes.

    The salt part was a different question I figured salt was salt for raw capes just didn’t know if there was a “salt” that seemed to work better then anything else you all have used when salting.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2022
  6. Keith

    Keith Well-Known Member

    A wet tanned frozen skin can be thawed as is. You can spray it down with a water atomizer if is drying out as you are working it.
    I take tanned frozen skins out the night before, keeping them in the plastic bag, and let them thaw on the shop floor.
    You can thaw in water, but then drain the skin well, or as I do, spin out in a spin cycle of a clothes washing machine.
    Placing the wet tanned skin in the fridge over the course of a few days will not hurt it as you are working on the mount. It sometimes takes a few days to do a big project, and I've had no troubles as long as the skin is kept cool. Just make sure the skin is damp and not too wet.
    You can refreeze a skin with no problems.
     
  7. BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO

    BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO New Member

    8
    3
    Perfect! Thanks Keith.



    QUOTE="Tanglewood Taxidermy, post: 2911821, member: 33152"]Are you starting a business?[/QUOTE[/QUOTE]
     
    Robert Baker likes this.
  8. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    On frozen green capes, take them out before you go to work, and they will be thawed when you get off work. If they are in an air conditioned room, you will have no issues. They can be placed in a fridge until the next evening if you don't get done with them on the first day. Rather than bag them, I roll the up, head first, into a dry towel and place in the fridge.
     
  9. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Are you starting a business?
     
  10. BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO

    BAKEROUTDOORSTUDIO New Member

    8
    3
    Not at this time . I am working on deer I have and a few capes I bought .


    In May I was at a week long school Which they had us flesh raw capes, then also finish wet tan capes before mounting , being it was 8-10 hr days I wasn’t worried about not getting them done & re stored. Nor did I think about it at the time .

    Now getting ready to start my own from start to finish solo and limited time during the week I don’t want to rush nor mess my cape Up any way and wanted to make sure I was on track .


    Do you have anything to add to what others have suggested ?

    LThanks for your time



    QUOTE="Tanglewood Taxidermy, post: 2911881, member: 33152"]Are you starting a business?[/QUOTE]
     
    Robert Baker likes this.
  11. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I like to thaw frozen capes tanned and raw, by hanging them in a bag off of the floor over night.

    When you start your business, business classes are far more important than taxidermy classes and taxidermy classes are super important.
     
  12. hoytarcher

    hoytarcher Member

    73
    9
    Iowa
    I really like your advice on this and would like to know what your biggest obstacle is/was with running your business? Would you do it again?
     
  13. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I ran my business as a full time operation and it was my second job. Because of that I was spending 40 to 50 hrs at my day job and about that much at my taxidermy business. My biggest obstacle was finding time for my family. No time to hunt, take care of the house or myself. After several years I was burned out and closed shop. My life is so much better now.

    Doing taxidermy though, was really a cool gig and would be still at it, probably, if it would have been my only job.
     
    Robert Baker likes this.
  14. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    The greatest obstacle with taxidermy (or any business) is cash flow. You've got to eat bologna, and not ribeyes while all that deposit money is sitting in the bank. Deposit money is your operating capital. It must be used with discretion. Once specimens are completed and the client is contacted, 75% will pickup within a week or so. 25% will drag their feet and come at their convenience, not yours. Ribeye's come on the day a specimen leaves, not the day a specimen arrives.
     
    fishnl8, Robert Baker, tem and 4 others like this.
  15. Clew

    Clew Help a child, Build our future

    8,893
    17,367
    York, SC
    So well said Joey
    I see so many blow that money right away