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Fleshing

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by Sheepdawg, Dec 8, 2022.

  1. Sheepdawg

    Sheepdawg New Member

    Hello everybody … New member here and this is my first post. I’m glad to be here and look forward to getting to know you. If I’m posting in the wrong spot I apologize.

    I’m certain my question has been beaten to death so I apologize, but I think it’s valid as technology continues to improve and advance. I am looking to purchase a quality fleshing machine and hope to get some constructive feedback here. I know this will (hopefully) be something I won’t have to purchase again for a very long time and am willing to spend the money on a quality product.

    I’ve researched Dakota Pro, Eager Beaver, S&S, Quebec as well as the American Eagle offered through Matuska. Again … I’m not trying to light a match here ! But your input and feedback would be greatly appreciated!!
     
  2. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    Your tanneries use raw hide eager beaver are the most popular
    S&S are fine as are the rest.
    Now not knocking any machines down but you’ll always see the Dakota up for sale a lot. Reason for a lot is up grading their machines as they’ve seen what the top two preforms . There catch is micro tuning. For the love of me I’ll never understand that as I have my two steels in my hand I can micro tune my machine in seconds compared to turn this dial then this , try it then turn it again and again till you find it but that’s my opinion on them. No matter what machine you pick make sure you learn it well.
    plus not saying anything but I would also purchase my blades from DH Price @fleshingmachines.com He sells top quality blades and only sharpens his blades. There tannery blades , soft steel easy to tune and can last of not more than 200-300 plus hides. But for it to last that long before reground is learning how to use your steels.
     
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  3. Sheepdawg

    Sheepdawg New Member

    Thanks for the feedback Frank. To clarify, are you saying your opinion is that rawhide and eager beaver fleshing are top of the line in your opinion? I’m certain there are many good products out there that will do the job. I’m just trying to do my homework and make an informed decision before spending money.

    I have heard of DH Price and was told he would be a good person to ask this question to as well. Thanks again Frank!
     
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  4. Keith

    Keith Well-Known Member

    I have an Eager Beaver, and use a Rawhide where I work. Both are good machines once the blades are adjusted.
     
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  5. Sheepdawg

    Sheepdawg New Member

    Thanks Keith. Can I ask if there is a particular model Eager Beaver you have or if they even offer different models?
     
  6. Keith

    Keith Well-Known Member

    The eager beaver is around 30 years old, and it is the free standing model. I have no idea what they even offer anymore. In my shop back then, I built a table at a comfortable height that hinged on the wall for saving space. I would either stand behind or sat on a high stool for operation.
    The Rawhide where I work is on a workbench that is about 4' by 4'. I'm guessing the table is about 36" tall.
     
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  7. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    They still sell eager beaver as my friend got one last year and I set it up for him. he got the table top one.
     
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  8. jerhuntr

    jerhuntr Member

    54
    11
    Just bought a Dakota Pro, barely using it now. Benchtop model. Tried to make it the same height as my workbench for expanded work table. I'm finding now that none of my chairs or stools fit properly! Ending up standing over it for now. I might have to shorten my wood stool legs to fit right and get comfortable. Getting as comfortable as you can is key for any longevity for any equipment. And due to a bad ankle I don't like standing for a long time. Just something to think of
     
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  9. D.Price

    D.Price Well-Known Member

    Well, here I am! Personally the best machine ever made is the Raw Hide whether it is the taxidermy or fur dressing model. Many folks in Canada will disagree with me and say the Quebec is by far superior(may be a made in Canada thing) as they are used widely in the tanneries scattered all across Canada. Many of your questions can be answered here at this link. https://fleshingmachines.com/

    DP
     
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  10. Keith

    Keith Well-Known Member

    Just measured the table height for the rawhide machine at work. 38"

    I'm 5' 10" and would probably build it about an 1 higher for more comfort. Although I don't think you could ever make them comfortable to operate.
     
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  11. jerhuntr

    jerhuntr Member

    54
    11
    Top of my table I think is 33 inches. But again, I was trying to figure out a way to sit down and that's the height of my workbench table that I slide it against to create a big table.. Probably not going to happen. I think the way the machine is recessed into the table takes up more reaching and comfort space. Maybe a stand-up model supported at the table edge, you might be able to get a little closer. Motor seems to be in the way for me to sit at all, then I can't see!
     
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  12. jerhuntr

    jerhuntr Member

    54
    11
    Bayou bones and tan, he uses a bicycle seat that swings away it looks like
     
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  13. ARUsher

    ARUsher Well-Known Member

    Either way you go, i would recommend mounting it to one of the adjustable work benches you can get at Home Depot. Makes it easy to adjust to whatever height you need to be comfortable for you. Whether standing or sitting on a stool.
     
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