1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Tillie Meyer Table Top Fleshing Machine??

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by BamaHuntin, Feb 7, 2008.

  1. BamaHuntin

    BamaHuntin Member

    143
    1
    I have been offered one of these for $225 that is said to be used only a couple of times.Anybody have one of these or know anything about them? I tried this post in the Beginner forum with no luck.Looking to get my first flesher to mess around with some of the coytotes I kill and try some mounts.
    Thanks,
    JE
     
  2. BamaHuntin

    BamaHuntin Member

    143
    1
    Thanks for the post hudson.What problems do you have with air? I have a shop that is already plumbed for air if that would make a easier.
    This is the one I was talking about.What do you guys think?

    [​IMG]

    Tillie Meyer Mini Fleshing Machine
    The Tillie Meyer air-powered flesher is easy to use, simple to clean, and made to last. This flesher will replace work usually done by hand and knife. Designed by Trent Meyer with safety in mind, it makes working on small animals simple and profitable. It can be used as a stationary or hand-held model. Includes both a round currier knife blade (like larger table units) as well as a toothed fleshing blade (like hand-held units). Requires an air compressor (not included) capable of sustaining 3-4 CFM at 50-85 psi. Includes foot control, air pressure regulator/filter, inline oiler, air hoses, blades, guards, and sharpening steel. Can be used on mammals, reptiles, birds and fish.



    Code Item Description Price
    TM301 Tillie Meyer Mini Fleshing Machine 349.95
     

  3. I have a good friend who owns and operates his own full time professional taxidermy shop in Illinois and uses one himself, loves it and highly recommend to me as well!
    I just ordered one from Research Manikins 2 days ago and it will be here Monday 2/30/17! I can't wait to try it out!

    My shop is air-powered anyway as we use a Bostitch Stapler for our work as well - so it's a 'Win Win' as far as we are concerned!
     
  4. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Research Mannikins has a tanning DVD. It they use that flesher. It is loud as you would expect from a pneumatic tool, bit it seemed to work really well.
     
  5. YOu will need a 60 gallon tank to run it. 5 hp or larger. I bought one once and never again. Save your money and see D price about a rebuilt
     
    George likes this.
  6. I disagree. I have a 6 gallon compressor and it works just fine....doesn't get overheated or anything.
    Also, the tool itself it as quiet as Hell! It's only air running the toll itself!

    I love mine!
     
  7. I disagree. I have a 6 gallon compressor and it works just fine....doesn't get overheated or anything.
    Also, the tool itself it as quiet as Hell! It's only air running the toll itself!

    I love mine!
     
  8. Rhino

    Rhino Too many irons in the fire will put the fire out!

    Gotta go with John! I don't see the point of a small machine period. I could shave the paw pads of a bobcat with a full size machine, so that "small is better for detail work", is a moot point, and just isn't true. Just looked at Keith Daniels machine, and it seems to be a quality product. Honestly never used one though. http://arlingtoncape.com/p/cape-master-shaver
     
  9. True. But do you really think somebody who is just doing this perhaps as a hobby want to go out and spend $900-$1000 on a machine that only does a couple deer heads are such per year perhaps? Mine is much more economical if that's the case. If somebody's running a professional business through such then that's different.
     
  10. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I spent $1500 on a fleshing machine and table when I was doing 3 to 5 a year. So, yes, I think somebody who is just doing this perhaps as a hobby would want to go out and spend $900-$1000 or more, on one. I thin the eye lids, nose pad and nostrils as well as the "tear duct" and lip line with my Dakota Pro. Being able to shave an entire cape from nose to shoulder in less than a half hour seems pretty economical to me.

    I must say though, that I had an idea that I was going to eventually get into it as a business when I bought it.
     
  11. I think this thread might already be dead after 2 years but I will ask this question. I was told that a bronze phosphor wire brush mounted on a bench grinder will work for fleshing if used carefully.
    I ask this question because of a limited budget and even more limited skill.
     
  12. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Nothing ever dies on the TaxiNet.
    John C has spoken a parable and I'm going to say the same things, maybe even harsher. If you have the money to buy one of these "hand held" POS fleshers, you have enough to buy a real round knife fleshing machine. Though the hand unit is relatively cheap, the compressor, regulator and air hose/couplings would be just as much. If you're a beginner, DO NOT BE CONNED INTO WASTING YOUR MONEY. You can flesh the way our pioneers did with a good knife, a fleshing beam and perhaps several pairs of good, sharp scissors.

    As for the wire wheel, I go with the routine stainless steel ones. Bronze wire wheels seldom last long. The wires tend to get bent very quickly. To be effective, the wire needs to retain SOME aggressiveness. You can buy the longer bristle, finer wire brush wheels that will rely on friction less than bronze. Just be careful the first few times so you don't have the wheel wrap your hide around the spindle.