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purpose of salting?

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by humphreyjm, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. humphreyjm

    humphreyjm New Member

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    Does salting in any way help with breaking down tissue for easier fleshing, or is it only for drying and preservation and setting the hair of a hide before tanning?
     
  2. rebel

    rebel New Member

    yes it will help
     

  3. Becky P

    Becky P One must believe the glass is half full.

    I don't think it helps with fleshing. I hate to get salt on a hide that I'm fleshing, to me it only seems to dull the blade faster.
     
  4. RoyalOaksRanch

    RoyalOaksRanch Royal Oaks Taxidermy- When Quality Counts...

    I agree with Becky... I dont like salt when im fleshing either... seems like it does dull the blade quicker..Id rather flesh while its still nice and squeeshy raw LOL..
     
  5. Becky P

    Becky P One must believe the glass is half full.

    LOL, "squeeshy" :)
     
  6. Laurier

    Laurier Active Member

    I do not salt , I put ALUM in my PICKELING , it draws the moisture from the fat , and I flesh it all off with the fleshing machine , and running a salted skin through the fleshing machine will dull en your blade.
     
  7. Rush

    Rush New Member

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    could you explane your method to me Laurier? Please correct me if I'm wrong, but you don't salt at all?, you just use alum in your pickle and then flesh" How long do you have to wait before fleshing? Do you re-hydrate your skins? I try to learn something new every day
     
  8. You need to call him. Let us all know how it goes..."If any one needs help you can call me 705-476-0483" ;D
     
  9. Rush

    Rush New Member

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    Mr. Patton, can you send me a list? I was gonna ask you before I made that last post, but went ahead and did it anyways. I guess I'm a glutten for punishment>
     
  10. I go through blades plenty faster when I use salt, but I just love the way it helps me get a better grip on the hide, and on the rare occasion I've had to leave a hide overnight in the fridge after partially fleshing it (with the salt) the next day sometimes it really seems like the hide is much easier to work with (the membrane comes off in big sheets, the tissue is easier to pull and seperate, etc). Just me though, but I'm pretty new.
     
  11. rebel

    rebel New Member

    he didn't ask if you liked to salt before you fleshed he asked if it makes it easier and it dose i can remember when i was just learning and i was told to salt the hide a hour or so before i fleshed it to make it easier even though i don't or would not do it now because it dose wear a blade out
     
  12. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Thank you Hudson, I was beginning to wonder if anyone would get to the question.

    Salt is used to take out the moisture within the cell structures of a hide. Glen Conley had a Dr. friend of his explain the process fully. It is NOT used to assist in fleshing. For FLESHING, you can use sawdust or corncob grit and doo a phenomenal job. To SHAVE a hide, it should be pickled, though I shave mine green and after the hide is tanned. Alum is not a replacement for salt and does not serve that purpose. Salt i pH neutral while alum is not. The salt drawing out the cell moisture aids in making the hide "thirsty" for the pickling and tanning chemicals.
     
  13. Becky P

    Becky P One must believe the glass is half full.

    Then the answer is no, at least not in my experience.
     
  14. Rush,
    The last time you were posting with an urging for the posters to call you personally. Well, Laurier will talk to you in depth about tanning on the phone if you have the time. He keeps his number posted in the forums.

    The list you are referring to used to be called the "little orange button". It is available in the old forum archives. If you are getting testy over that, then you will never make it through a Roof lashing.

    When you get there, look for something like this:
     
  15. humphreyjm

    humphreyjm New Member

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    Hudson, Thanks. I did not think salt would chemically change the tissue. Dehydrating and closing the skin pores is a good explanation. Perhaps in dehydrating the tissue it also shrinks it which might help release it from the underlying hide.

    George, your reply above answered another question I had about whether you could shave a hide after the tan. Do you do this on a dry hide, or would you have to rehydrate it first?
     
  16. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Never shave a dry hide.
     
  17. Salting does not "break down" tissue. Looks like that is not what you meant to ask anyway from your response. It wrings the water out of the hide. Bacteria need water to survive. By removing the water through salting, you eliminate the fluids that bacteria are active in. This stoppage of bacterial activity preserves the hair follicle where the bacteria would normally concentrate in the decomposition process. Decomposers are present in every aspect of the taxidermy process and the salting method is the best way to thwart decomposition.

    Salting also works for the taxidermist tanner as opposed to the air dry method that trappers use for fur bearers destined for the auction and ultimately some type of garment. The salt liquifies and fills the cellular void through osmotic forces of high saline to low saline content and once the hide dries, the resulting saltresidue left in the cell structure will dissolve when rehydrated making th ehide easier to work with.
     
  18. hn. That was actually really interesting.. to hear it from the perspective of the museum curator/biologist. Thanks, AYoung.