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Wrapped Bodies

Discussion in 'Lifesize Mammals' started by Jim B, Mar 25, 2008.

  1. Jim B

    Jim B Active Member

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    Questions come up from time to time about wrapping bodies.Anybody interested in learning how can find information in the following books.Most of these are out of print but if you do a search on Ebay or Amazon,you can usually find them.I've seen them as low as $2.00 to $10.00.Another is "Practical Taxidermy" by Moyer.[​IMG]
     
  2. Jim B

    Jim B Active Member

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    That picture may not be clear enough."The Squirrel Mounting Book" by Leon Pray,"Taxidermy" by Leon Pray,"The Jonas Technique,Mammals"
     

  3. oldterryr

    oldterryr Terry's in Heaven with no worries at all.

    wrapping bodies is brian dead simple - get some excelsior - a carcass - and wrap body To look like carcass - duh!

    without carcass IT IS TOUGH
     
  4. snowhare

    snowhare New Member

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    Well , even with out a carcass , it is simple , just start small and fit it , and than build it up till you think it is ok.

    After this , when you think it is still to small , leave it like so , and mount the mammel, and before sewing it up , just ad cut exelsior pices from about 1, to 2,5 inc long untill it fits

    Greatings the Wrapping man from the netherlands

    PS NEVER USE A CARCASS ANY WAY , JUST DO IT
     
  5. your geting that spark back buddy LOL, glad your feeling a little better terry/
     
  6. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Well, Terry, at least you're HALF right. Wrapping bodies is "brain dead". I do it in some cases (and if the availability of American supplies was an issue as I understand it is in many countries, I'd wrap too) but usually as a last resort. Anyone can WRAP a body. Doing it where it doesn't look like a stretched weenie or a balloon is a different thing. With the glut of good/quality forms on the market today,there is absolutely NO advantage in wrapping a body. The foam bodies can be cut and altered so much more easily that you'd have to be brain dead not to use them. If you're tempted to try it, these books are great, but be ready to either rebuild the animals skull OR to carve one out of FOAM.
     
  7. oldterryr

    oldterryr Terry's in Heaven with no worries at all.

    i use replacement heads on mine -
     
  8. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Terry, just think, for a few bucks more you could buy a "replacement head" on a REPLACEMENT MANIKIN. LMAO
     
  9. Thanks Jim I am going to look for that Jonas technique book.
     
  10. It is great fun to wrap your one bodies I also use replacement heads
    gr Henk
     
  11. Jim B

    Jim B Active Member

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    Codi,one just sold on Ebay for $8.00.The Jonas book has some information on repairing hides,making rugs,mounting,sculpting forms,tanning etc..Like all these old books,there are materials and techniques that are not pertinent today but there are some jems in all of them that we can learn from.I like to keep up with new ways of doing things but also like to keep in touch with some of the older methods as they sometimes have their place too.Just look at some of the art that Henk and some of the other European taxidermists as well as our own Wildlife Artist, are producing with wrapped bodies.That's an ancient method but in skilled hands can produce outstanding results.I agree that it may be mechanically simple to wrap a body,but like all methods,to produce outstanding results,it takes a study of animal anatomy and movement as well as some little tricks for that medium,to do it well.Flexible bodies are great for small mammals as they give some flexibility in positioning and make it easier to adapt them to natural pieces of wood etc..I agree that for most commercial work,commercial mannikins are more efficient(sometimes,anyway) but I also think it's important to have some other tools in the arsenal.
     
  12. Peter Span

    Peter Span Corvids, gotta catch them all!

    George, why on earth would it be braindead to wrap a body. It is much more fun to give an animal a personal touch instead of using a boring braindead commercial form.
     
  13. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Peter, I KNOW you know that I can do the same things to a foam manikin that I can to a wrapped body ON ANIMALS. If I was any good at it, I'd probably still wrap bird bodies as they compensate for my laziness in defatting and degreasing. With a wrapped body manikin, you can make NO relief cuts and that alone makes the foam body superior in every way to the wrapped body. Unless you heavily clay the wrapped form, you get no muscle definition (i.e. ribcage, extruded shoulder blades). If you depend on "replacement heads", then there's little purpose in using a dissimilar medium for the body. To each his own, I suppose.
     
  14. oldterryr

    oldterryr Terry's in Heaven with no worries at all.

    relief cuts are the easiest part of wrapped bodies - you might notice i didnt volunteer how i do it - some things are better left to discover on your own - i also didnt say how to do extruded shouler blades - you wont see these tricks in my learning center but are abnormally fast to produce with wrapped bodies or maybe i should say wrapped pieces - there are many ways to skin a (bob)cat -
     
  15. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Actually, Terry, foling the skin up under the leg doesn't create the natural appearance of what an armpit relief cut doesn. The shoulder blade made above the leg and attached still has to be clayed in to give any natural flow to the piece. I was born at night, but not last night. I learned all the "tricks" half a century ago and discarded them when better products and mankins became available. Even the paper forms worked better with relief cuts as you could stuff half the animal inside that paper shell of a body. The fiberglass forms made it a bit more interesting and the expandable beads almost made you want to wrap a body instead. And the ribs still have to be sculpted out of clay and carded (or more appropriately, "roped") as the dextrine glue would dissolve into the clay before it held the hide unless carded.
     
  16. wa

    wa Thanks John...this depicts me better

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    The talent that some on this forum show in their works and the knowledge they give , far far surpass even what my imagination can think of.
     
  17. oldterryr

    oldterryr Terry's in Heaven with no worries at all.

    good guesses george but incorrect - wa cryptic very cryptic
     
  18. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Not a guess Terry. Remember, I've seen your work. I know how they're SUPPOSED to be done. Henry Wichers Inchemuk spells it out pretty well in his Volume 28, No.5 edition of American Taxidermist magazine The last paragraph is probably the most telling: " It takes a lot of painstaking, meticulous, patient effort to do an outstanding reconstruction. There is also a lot of satisfaction in seeing the final beauty of recreating the appearance of life without movement."
     
  19. oldterryr

    oldterryr Terry's in Heaven with no worries at all.

    i give up- i thot it was you and i that knew everything but i submit to your superior intellect
     
  20. lee tees valley

    lee tees valley tweety luvva.

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    not the old wrapped body argument again ;D it's like groundhog day on here :D to each there own. ;) .those that can do .those that can'r buy commercial foam form's.. : :( ;D ;)