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UPDATE!! how can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by MattHCT, Jun 9, 2008.

  1. MattHCT

    MattHCT New Member

    I know I've asked a kinda similar question, but just need some clarification. I have a buffalo skull totally sealed in two plastic bags. They've been in there for 2 1/2 months. I read on here that some folks say they could just wash the slime off , dry and then feed to the beetles. This thing is still moist and has no fly larva on it. I would rather use the beetles than maceration. Any input would help this beetle green horn. :)

    I forgot to add that the skull is skinned and eyes and jaw are removed.

    Thanks
     
  2. bulldog4949

    bulldog4949 "Mounting your Memories"

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    My personal opinion.....I would macerate it. Especially if it is that rotten. Get a big container, and fill it with hot water. Use an aquarium heater if possible. Should not take long if they are that rotten already. Let sit for a few weeks, and take out and change the water. DO NOT wash the head off. LEave it be, and just place back in the water....it will keep the bacteria on it, to start a new batch in the fresh water.

    You could use beetles though if you want. Take out....wash REALLY good, let dry a little, and freeze to kill any larvae or bugs on the skull. Then into the beetles.

    Good luck however you want to go.
     

  3. MattHCT

    MattHCT New Member

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    Thanks for the info. Just to clarify, do you think it's too rotten for the beetles at this point?
    Thanks Matt
     
  4. staffs-skeletons

    staffs-skeletons www.skeletonsUK.com

    605
    0
    UK
    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    In my experience beetles will eat very rotten meat but it takes them longer. If you go for beetles go with what the last post said. But make sure the flesh is really dry!!! Also remember that your colony is going to smell terrible when this is done.

    I personally would go for maceration on something so big and rotten.
     
  5. MattHCT

    MattHCT New Member

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    Thank you
     
  6. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    You need a tremendous population of beetles to do a buffalo skull justice...especially this time of the year. That stinking skull will attract every bug that you don't want in your colony to it. Bulldog gave good advice...macerate it. On buffalo, I immerse in a water trough and forget about it for a month in this hot weather. Drain, refill, and wait another month.

    Your question about a skull being too rotton...there is no such thing. Beetles will eat it, though not as readily at most any phase of putrefaction. Again, it would need to be frozen for at least three days to kill off any existing vermin living in it.
     
  7. MattHCT

    MattHCT New Member

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    I have about #5000 beetles right now, is that a good size for a buffalo?
    Thanks for all the info.
     
  8. Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    Not even close in my opinion. 5000 might be decent for a whitetail skull or something, but it could still take them a few days to finish it. I would not even attempt a buffalo skull in good shape until your beetles are cleaning deer and bear in 24 hours. This is just my opinion, others may have different views.
    Travis
     
  9. lookn4awhitetail

    lookn4awhitetail "I shoot a Mathews, cause I dont wanna Hoyt them"

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    I took a Watusi Steer out of a trough of water yesterday, Been in there for three weeks, And we have had some terrribly hot weather, After power washing it there was still some of the connective tissue left in the back, So I dumped him back in, How much longer yall reckon it will need to stay in there.
     
  10. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    Another three weeks, then check again. On small skulls, I have had javalena completely macerate in one week....that's right one week in a five gallon bucket setting on top of my shed in hot summer weather. I was amazed myself...these skulls were clean and grease free.
     
    Dale Loescher likes this.
  11. lookn4awhitetail

    lookn4awhitetail "I shoot a Mathews, cause I dont wanna Hoyt them"

    Re: At what point can you tell if a skull is to rotten for the beetles to eat?

    Thanks,
     
  12. MattHCT

    MattHCT New Member

    I kept the skull in the plastic bags. I just took it out today, I washed it off with the garden hose and it's clean as a whistle.
    This is the first time I've used maceration and it made a believer out of me. Although I did'nt submerse it in water the plastic bags worked well.
    Thanks again for the input. :)
     
  13. Jubela

    Jubela Wallabies come in one flavor...Wallaby!

    The beetles will eat it even if it is really rotten, but I would use maceration. Leave a mess like that outside. Rotting brain is the worst smell ever, and you don't want that scent lingering in your bug tank.
     
  14. Gobblingfever

    Gobblingfever 100% PEER GOBBLER ADDICTION!!!!

    Got me a question about the maceration. The jaw. The inside of the jaw is a hole. How do you get rid of all the white mushy greasy stuff inside. I can get all the skulls clean but one thing I can not get out. I will try and enclose picture.
     
  15. Gobblingfever

    Gobblingfever 100% PEER GOBBLER ADDICTION!!!!

    Oops forgot picture. Sorry if I got off topic but thoguth I would ask while on here reading this one.
     
  16. ReporterSr

    ReporterSr If you think education is expensive, try ignorance

    Good to know that brain tissue is the worst. That explains to me a lot. I used maceration for a completely intact American crocodile head. (I have the necessary permits to possess it.) Even sealed in a watertight container, we could smell it. When opened after a few weeks, it was incredibly awful. I just closed it up again after changing some, but not all, the water, let it sit for a month. Came out beautifully white and this second batch of water wasn't all that bad. Dawn and water took care of the grease. Flushing the water into the ground (all this was in the backyard), took care of the rest of the odor. It made me a believer in maceration.
     
  17. pick sets are sold by taxidermy supply companies that work for it they look kinda like dentist tools. i've picked most of it out with tooth pick/wooden skewers) personally i also like to put a small dot of elmers in there and use a toother pick to coat the inside of that thing , but dont put a ton in there or you'll seal up the hole i just put a small coat along the inside just in case there was a little of that white residue type stuff left.



    I've had a couple locals bring in heads that road in trucks for over a week (i personally seen it there at least a week) but it had to be quite a bit longer than that showign it off as a torphy he brings it in wanting it "meat eatting bug cleaned" and swears it's only been there overnight. when they come in nasty i most often suggest they just let me macerate them.