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Sunday morning questions(SMQ's) part 29

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by Rick Krane, Sep 10, 2006.

  1. Rick Krane

    Rick Krane Fish Taxidermist/ Judge/ Sculptor/ Instructor

    Week 29

    Good Sunday Morning! Sorry for the delay Yesterday was My Daughter Ambers Birthday and we just back! She is 8 and in my humble opinion 100 times smarter then I’ll ever be never mind ever was? LOL! I read here the questions she said they were ok this week however she would like to see more picture questions and more questions on Blue gills and small mouth bass. LOL!!!

    A question came up this week to me (Like I would know the answer?) about the applied and smite thing? I don’t know much about it but I think it just maybe the new way to show some one who much you respect or like there writing or helping out. I Know I have read some of the postings and folks who are real helpful people who are not controversial or muckraker's (LOL) still get smited! LOL!!!!! Well that’s how life goes and maybe it is a new way to look at the old adage about imitation being the highest form of flattery... well maybe being smited is too? Heck I even have several smites! LOL!!!! I haven’t even chewed anyone’s backside out in a while (well maybe one) LOL!
    Some folks just don’t like other folks for want ever reason but don’t let this stop you! I had some one tell me who is very helpful that they didn’t want to write any more because they thought their information was not being valued because they keep getting smite points. Well All I can say is KEEP doing good work and helping others put as you do! Ever one on here today who post gets a good karma points! So there you will be rewarded for your kindness and your willingness to help others! LOL!!!

    It is all in good fun! Smite.. No smite… It is all good! LOL! OK!

    I thank you and WASCO for letting me share in my passion "FISH! As long as you keep answering the questions, I will keep writing them.

    So with out further ado! Lets Get the morning stared to a new week with some fish/ taxidermy talk! The good people at WASCO give us the free opportunity here to share information so we can be better-informed taxidermist! So in the spirit of WASCO generosity we share freely with each other!

    1. Why do we charge more money as a rule for reproductions as apposed to skin mounted fish?

    2. How do you go about putting the color stripe on a rainbow trout? Explain how and what colors you may use.

    3. How much time do you spend rebuilding on the inside of the mouth of a fish? Lets say on warm water or even a repro as there is always some work to be done? What do you repair or rebuild and how?

    4. What are some really important considerations when choosing what airbrush to buy?

    5. What is a paint schedule and how do you come up with one?

    6. If you as a taxidermist catch a nice fish for your own collection how do you go about getting it from the water to the freezer? Tell us what you do to preserve your fish for the freezer?

    7. Have you ever looked at a mounted fish that was poorly done and said to your self that is bad taxidermy? OK we have all been there now here’s the question. If that bad fish mount was 8 or 10 dollars were inch how much more is good work worth? How do you separate the customer from paying for bad work and paying you more for better work?

    8. Root, Panel, or by it self… What is the most typical customer hanger for their fish?

    9. Tell us how you set and eye? Where does the pupil go and how do you figure out the angles and the depth?

    Bonus Question
    10. Is this a trout or a char? What make you think one over the other? How does this apply to your taxidermy work? See picture at the bottom of the post!


    I would hope it goes without saying that I may not have a an answer your looking for but some one on here will! Feel free to write me or call if you have a question and maybe it will end up here to others who want to know the same information as you.

    Give it a shot!

    Any one who emails me personally with the answers will get a few free reference photos from my personal collection. I still want you to answer here so other can benefit form your input on this topic line.

    It is all because of you and your awesome replies this has become so successful!
    From beginners to the seasoned pro's every one contributes and all benefit from your great experiences! Let see if I we can get more responses on the forum as well as in my email. I will give you some free fish reference photos for the asking just for contributing! As always I just think your answers are so good more and more contribute on here for all see!
    My Best and have fun with this!

    Rick Krane
    Anglers Artistry
    312 Chesterfield Rd
    Hinsdale, NH 03451
    603.336.7296
     
  2. Rick Krane

    Rick Krane Fish Taxidermist/ Judge/ Sculptor/ Instructor

    Oh BTW! Tell me what kind of fish this is and the first one gets a Photo CD of some of my reference photos! So the first one who gets it correct will get a photo CD!

    My Best and Good Luck!

    Rick Krane
    Anglers Artistry
     

  3. Richard C

    Richard C Well-Known Member

    1,690
    163
    Raimbow Trout and I'm not a fish guy. I just catch and eat them.
     
  4. KevinH

    KevinH Active Member

    Steelhead
     
  5. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    1. Why do we charge more money as a rule for reproductions as apposed to skin mounted fish?

    I charge the same for both. I find, although I have to pay for the blank (I don't cast my own at this point), the amount of labor is less which makes it pretty much a wash in comparison to a skin mount. Actually I find not contending with building up shrinkage, fin coating and backing, back seam work, etc. on a good quality blank it's a refreshing change of pace!

    2. How do you go about putting the color stripe on a rainbow trout? Explain how and what colors you may use.

    I put down a gold base under the stripe color I use. I mix yellow and red in a ratio that gives me the color I want. Many times I also tip in some silver scales. Sometimes on a chormish fish that just has a hint of pink I just use red very lightly. I've also seen steelhead with a more violet color.

    3. How much time do you spend rebuilding on the inside of the mouth of a fish? Lets say on warm water or even a repro as there is always some work to be done? What do you repair or rebuild and how?

    Not sure how much time it takes but I fill in any damage from skinning, build up the tongue to it's original shape and build up the bottom lip with Apoxie sculpt. I've seen other mounts where the taxidermist didn't bother. IMHO it's imperative.

    4. What are some really important considerations when choosing what airbrush to buy? It does what I want it to do, simplicity, and ease of cleaning and maintainence. I'm considering checking out the high end brushes that everyone raves about, but my H-1 Paashe pretty much does everything I need it to. I guess I'm a KISS kind of guy. (Keep it Simple Stupid).

    5. What is a paint schedule and how do you come up with one? A paint schedule as everyone knows is supposed to show you step by step how to paint a particular species. I think they're a great way to help a beginner, and can even give more advanced painters some ideas. I only come up with them now to help others on here or help students. A fish taxidermist should at some point be able to look at a fish and determine what colors he should use to duplicate it.

    6. If you as a taxidermist catch a nice fish for your own collection how do you go about getting it from the water to the freezer? Tell us what you do to preserve your fish for the freezer?

    If I'm out a in a boat on public waters I put them on ice. However I rarely fish public waters anymore as I've had it with the crowds, jetskies, and rude people. The quality of expericen for the average angler is not tehre anymore in my state. On my own property I euthanize the fish with a fish anesthetic such as MS222, or Clove Oil or very small bit of Clorox in a cooler of water or place a bass or yellow perch in a wet towel and allow it to expire that way ( that's not a good idea for trout as they can discolor) Once the fish expires it's immediately placed on a plastic lined shelf of a freezer, and allowed to freeze. Once it solidified I place wet paper towelling over the fins. Once the wet paper towel freezes solid the fish is vacumn sealed a foodsaver material. This is what I do with my commerical for sale fish also.

    7. Have you ever looked at a mounted fish that was poorly done and said to your self that is bad taxidermy? OK we have all been there now here’s the question. If that bad fish mount was 8 or 10 dollars were inch how much more is good work worth? How do you separate the customer from paying for bad work and paying you more for better work?

    Around here the bad work is even lower than 8 to 10 dollars an inch. Good work startes at 9 or 10 dollars an inch. Usually the customer gets what he pays for but I have seen high priced mounts that look like crap too. It's the exception but it does happen.

    8. Root, Panel, or by it self… What is the most typical customer hanger for their fish?

    Most of my customers prefer cedar driftwoodk or by itself. I do offer hardwood panels, and natural bark panels though. I find they usually pic what you have on display and too many choices can confuse them.

    9. Tell us how you set and eye? Where does the pupil go and how do you figure out the angles and the depth?

    I "eyeball it." No pun intended! ;D Narrow part of the pupil is forward obviously and the pupil is level with the angle of the fish (there is a limit). I dont' want them in to far in, but I don't go for the bug eyed look either -- although I've seen it on live fish. I also want the eye to be parallel with the plane of the fish and usually hold the fish against the wall to get that right. Of course there are some other things you can do if you want a special effect.

    Bonus Question
    10. Is this a trout or a char? What make you think one over the other? How does this apply to your taxidermy work? See picture at the bottom of the post!

    A Char is a brook trout, lake trout, dolly varden, bull trout, arctic char and a few other minor species. A trout is a general term for a brown and rainbow trout although the brookie is commonly called a trout by anglers. If we wanted to be more accurate we should call a brook trout a brook char like some in Canada do.

    Char typically have strong white edges to the ventral fins and have a dark background with light spots vs. a light background with dark spots as on rainbows and browns. There are other differences too, such as amount of teeth and where they are placed. I personally find the spawning colors of most of the chars absolutely breathtaking.

    Scientists now consider all the western trout i.e. rainbows and goldens as salmon and have but them into the salmon genus onchorhynchus with the pacific salmon. They are saying now the only true "trout" we have is the brown trout which is not only not native, but it's closely related to the Atlantic salmon. Go figure. Maybe "trout" is just a colloquial generic term and really doesn't mean much?

    Obviously a taxidermist's knowledge of the difference between the species is paramount to reproducing them accuarately.

    I can only say what that fish pic is not: It's not in the char family as it would proabably have some distinct black pigment in the mouth. Am I right? Or if it is a char it isn't during spawning time.
     
  6. Rick Krane

    Rick Krane Fish Taxidermist/ Judge/ Sculptor/ Instructor

    So far no one has guest the picture. I may add in order to get the CD of reference you must guess the fish correctly and answer the SMQ's too!

    Good Luck So far each one of the folks who replied have received a Good Karma point! Even Cecil! Who answer of the fish surprised me? LOL!

    Good Luck!

    Rick Krane
     
  7. Rick Krane

    Rick Krane Fish Taxidermist/ Judge/ Sculptor/ Instructor

    From Our Good freind Ken http://www.internationalwildlifedesign.com/

    Rick,

    Thanks again for all of this…by the way, our Taxidermy in Focus website is online…see last nights posting under Taxidermy Industry. We look forward to the contributions from everyone.



    1. Why do we charge more money as a rule for reproductions as apposed to skin mounted fish?

    Speaking for myself, whether I buy or build, I have more expense in a blank than I do in a skin mount.

    2. How do you go about putting the color stripe on a rainbow trout? Explain how and what colors you may use.

    I mix a bit of chrome pearlessence with a smidgen of gill red and maybe tone it down a tad with some candy yellow.

    3. How much time do you spend rebuilding on the inside of the mouth of a fish? Lets say on warm water or even a repro as there is always some work to be done? What do you repair or rebuild and how?

    I usually repair the throat and tongue areas with Apoxie Sculpt. Repros I would add the teeth and repair the same areas.

    4. What are some really important considerations when choosing what airbrush to buy?

    Simplicity of use and maintenance, comfort and performance.

    5. What is a paint schedule and how do you come up with one?

    It is a step by step scheme that as a rule we associate with the application of multiple colors in the finishing steps of our work. You generally come up with it through experience. I don’t really write them down that often. In a lot of cases they are so fluid in that you paint what you see in the individual fish and your reference. They are good to a point for beginners but too many rely on the schedule more that the reference.

    6. If you as a taxidermist catch a nice fish for your own collection how do you go about getting it from the water to the freezer? Tell us what you do to preserve your fish for the freezer?

    Put him in ice water until he gets lethargic (tide in water to euthanize)…Vaseline the fins and wrap in wax paper and card. Lay the fish on a flat surface in the freezer on top of plastic wrap. You can glaze him too…when he is just frozen, take him out, submerge him in water and set him back on the surface in the freezer. Once he is frozen solid, wrap him up and seal him out. I wouldn’t do this to every fish, only to an exceptional one. Most customers get the “wet towel” answer when they ask.


    7. Have you ever looked at a mounted fish that was poorly done and said to your self that is bad taxidermy? OK we have all been there now here’s the question. If that bad fish mount was 8 or 10 dollars were inch how much more is good work worth? How do you separate the customer from paying for bad work and paying you more for better work?



    Im not sure you can make a point that way to a customer. We cant justify to others the quality of our work by what we charge no more than we can justify poor work by what others pay for it. My opinion…charge what you think its worth. There are some who wont pay it but there are many that will.

    8. Root, Panel, or by it self… What is the most typical customer hanger for their fish?

    Driftwood!

    9. Tell us how you set and eye? Where does the pupil go and how do you figure out the angles and the depth?

    First, I place the eye in centered, tapered edge foreward and push it in to the desired depth. I like to get a slight roll so I will push in the lower and leading edges of the eye a bit depending on which way I want the eye to be focused.

    Bonus Question
    10. Is this a trout or a char? What make you think one over the other? How does this apply to your taxidermy work? See picture at the bottom of the post!

    It is very difficult to see in the picture but it appears that the fish has Palantine teeth, but no teeth on the vomer which would indicate that it is from the Char family. But I am no expert.
     
  8. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    1. Why do we charge more money as a rule for reproductions as apposed to skin mounted fish?

    I don't. My prices are the same.

    2. How do you go about putting the color stripe on a rainbow trout? Explain how and what colors you may use.
    I may use silver and gold to start with, followed with white paint, fogged on with silver pearl or gold pearl over the white. Then I apply different yellows and reds. If it's a purple stripe then I'll go with some reds and violets with some blues. Go over this and redo the tips of the scales and finish.

    3. How much time do you spend rebuilding on the inside of the mouth of a fish? Lets say on warm water or even a repro as there is always some work to be done? What do you repair or rebuild and how?

    Not much, casting with RTV gives me a pretty good mouth detail. I only fix air pockets from there.

    4. What are some really important considerations when choosing what airbrush to buy?

    Quality, work ability, what functions it has, tip sizes if any comes with it and reliability.

    5. What is a paint schedule and how do you come up with one?

    It's just a way of learning on how to paint a fish by numbers. I start with what's underneath a fish and work my way to the top colors. Having good reference is the key here.

    6. If you as a taxidermist catch a nice fish for your own collection how do you go about getting it from the water to the freezer? Tell us what you do to preserve your fish for the freezer?

    If I'm not close to home I carry borax with me and rub this all over the fish till I get it there ASAP. If I'm away and have a cooler with me, then it's ice water.

    7. Have you ever looked at a mounted fish that was poorly done and said to your self that is bad taxidermy? OK we have all been there now here’s the question. If that bad fish mount was 8 or 10 dollars were inch how much more is good work worth? How do you separate the customer from paying for bad work and paying you more for better work?

    Of course, we've all seen bad taxidermy. There is no way of saying what the price should be for good work. We feel that the better we are we should get paid more but the truth is, their are folks who do good work and get paid less for what they charge. It's the economy that can dictate this along with your clients.

    8. Root, Panel, or by it self… What is the most typical customer hanger for their fish?
    Root. It's more natural for a fish than a panel.

    9. Tell us how you set and eye? Where does the pupil go and how do you figure out the angles and the depth?

    Most of the time after it's mounted I set the eye in epoxy and shape the eye band from there to what the fish is doing. The point of the pupil is generally right below the nostrils. As foe the angles that can be very tough. A fish's eye is very independent and each one can be do one thing or another when it's just in a relaxed position but if it's focused on a subject then the eyes must protray that look.

    Bonus Question
    10. Is this a trout or a char? What make you think one over the other? How does this apply to your taxidermy work? See picture at the bottom of the post!
    Well the pic is blurry but my guess is a char....
     
  9. By the way Rick...I think it is a Dolly Varden. Just my guess.
     
  10. B.Fish

    B.Fish Good excuse not to get my work done!

    What's in a name? Not much here I believe. The picture is blurry but by the shape, teeth and colorations between the teeth rows, I would go with a Lake Trout. However, a Lake Trout is not a trout but a Char. If this is correct, it is a great trick question by Rick!
     
  11. HMMM...and the suspense grows!
     
  12. Capt. Bryan

    Capt. Bryan Guest

    Rick, Brook trout which is a char ???
     
  13. Brookie...oooh good one...do I hear Bull? Arctic? Are we getting warm?
     
  14. UFD

    UFD New Member

    1) I have charged more for skin mounts in the past and do occasionally depending upon what it is mostly for the reason of the extra labor involved, but for the most part I charge the same for both skin and repro. It does seem that the extra labor I have in a skin mount is mostly offset by the cost of the repro blank.

    2) My standard color for the stripe is Lifeton Dark Red in varying intensities depending upon the individual fish, and then I'll alter the color of that throughout the painting process with yellow, orange, brown, blue, and/or purple airbrush colors depending upon the nature of the red tint of the stripe. Sometimes I'll make a wash with some acrylic artist's paints using a different red or orange and work with that using a hand brush also. Of course, whatever combination of those colors is interspersed with scale tipping, both with a silver wax and either acrylic artist's paint or iridescents in an acrylic medium.

    3) Currently I cast all of my heads, including warmwater fish, so there is no rebuilding needed, generally speaking. When I used to use the real heads on warmwater fish, I'd at least rebuild the front sections of the tongue and the gullet. Most of the rebuilding that I did on a real head was on the fleshy areas of the outside of the head.

    4) For a "workhorse" airbrush I like it to be able to do BOTH a broad spray and a fine spot without slowing down or changing any tips and needles, so for me it has to be a double action. In my shop an airbrush that is only designed for fine detail is something that becomes clutter. I also believe that the airbrush should fit my hand well with either a cup or a bottle without my hand cramping due to personal ergonomics. Price is a desirable feature, too - I'd rather spend extra money on toys that I don't use for fish taxidermy rather than ultra high end airbrushes. Parts availability is important, because you never know when the airbrush will take a leap for the floor. I've used most brands of airbrushes, and I have found one that fits all of those desires well, so I'm happy.

    5) A paint schedule is basically a listing of the steps required to make a fish look painted (or tinted) in a certain way. Most (OK, all) of my paint schedules are in my head, and if I can't remember how I did a certain fish or if I haven't done one before, looks like I'll either learn the same way to do it, a different way to do it, or learn something completely new. I can see how commercial work in a very strict sense of the word will benefit from established paint schedules, but I follow more of a custom approach and paint schedules can have the negative impact of producing stylized work rather than work that tries to more closely mimic nature. I also go back and forth between some of the same colors multiple times throughout the process, and a written schedule would become way to long and confusing.

    6) Wow, I never catch any nice fish - LOL! Well, if I'm on the river bank, most of the time when we are fishing it's cold enough to just let it lay on the bank, in a river boat we'd have a fish box, and at a lake we'd either have a cooler with ice and/or a livewell. I can deal with anything short of a rotten fish, so I don't get too sensitive to how it is taken care of. Before it goes in the freezer I'll either put it in plastic bag or a wet towel and then plastic bag, or if I really want to look at the fish for several days before it gets wrapped, I'll put it in the freezer and start a glazing process before it gets bagged and tagged. I'd like to say that I would work right away on it and not have a need to freeze, but right now my clients get first dibs on my time.

    7) Good work is worth whatever the client is willing to pay. Some have a very good eye for detail, and they don't have any problems with my prices. Others just go for name recognition and word of mouth, and they pay because it's kind of a name brand concept. For the majority I basically tell them that I believe in value - hey will get their monies worth even if they pay me two to three times what others may charge. The price is dictated by the actual hands-on time I have in the work, and if my price is higher it is because I put more time into detail than someone at a lower price.

    8) Kind of a tie between driftwood root or habitat scene and by itself. Panels are the least typical for me.

    9) Using cast heads, I grind out the eye opening and set it from the back side, rotating it into the position that I want the eye focused. I'll normally point the pupil horizontally, with the tip of the tear drop facing forward, and sometimes alter the angle from horizontal very slightly depending upon the heading and/or focal point of the fish. That said, the pupil shape of all eyes currently on the market is incorrect for the coldwater fish that I work on. Rarely have I ever seen a natural eye in a salmonid that has the typical glass eye pupil shape. Many times the pointed part is pointed down, and it can be argued that there may even be two pointed sections. Reference will show this and indicate how overly simplified the commercial glass eye pupil is. I am very excited about the new Tohickon 137 series because with the design of the eye I can order them completely clear and paint the pupil shape to my reference. This will open up another neat aspect to fish taxidermy that is a long time coming. Now if they could only get the shape of the sclerotic capsule more full and comparable sized to a real fish eye.......

    10) It is a char, actual variety is difficult to surmise without more clues. It is a char because there are no teeth present on the shaft of the vomer, which is the bone running down the center of the roof of the mouth. Trout species have teeth at the head of the vomer following down the length of it, and char species only have teeth at the very tip end or head of the bone. This is important to know in fish taxidermy because you want to replicate the teeth in the manner of the real fish so that your fish mount can actually have some semblance of having scientific worth.
     
  15. UFD

    UFD New Member

    Whoa, check it out, when you put an "8" and a ")", it makes a "cool" smiley! So much for my numbering system. :)
     
  16. Rick Krane

    Rick Krane Fish Taxidermist/ Judge/ Sculptor/ Instructor

    UFD!!!!

    If I could I would give you 2 karma points! Way Cool Salmon!

    Oh BTW the answer is among the answers already given! I will let you know this evening who won the Disk!

    Great answers this week! Some folks know their trout form their Char!

    OK Additional Hint it is a late September spawner with some interesting distintion on the back section ( one of two in the Genus that shares the same distinction).

    Rick!
     
  17. Rick Krane

    Rick Krane Fish Taxidermist/ Judge/ Sculptor/ Instructor

    If you would like check out Monty Artrips Rainbow in the training section. Way cool effort!

    Rick
     
  18. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    1. Why do we charge more money as a rule for reproductions as apposed to skin mounted fish?

    I charge the same. I know a taxidermist around me that charges $4 bucks an inch MORE for his skin mounts than replicas though. Most start out with replicas more expensive simply because of the blank costs. I believe that with most customers, skin mounts will always be our bread and butter. So eventually, if the quality is good your numbers of skin mounts will increase until you have to raise your skin mount prices to slow things down. Eventually surpassing the replica prices in some instances. Of course, much of this has to do with supply and demand of quality work in your area - both skin mounts and replicas.

    2. How do you go about putting the color stripe on a rainbow trout? Explain how and what colors you may use.

    Well if you're talking a chromer with the "pink" stripe than I'm much simpler than most folks. The stripe goes on at the end. The fish is typically full of silver. And I simply use gill red thinned considerably (and I might add a little blue or something if the color needs to be tweaked) and the stripe gets painted on last thin enough to allow the underlying colors (silver) show through.

    3. How much time do you spend rebuilding on the inside of the mouth of a fish? Lets say on warm water or even a repro as there is always some work to be done? What do you repair or rebuild and how?

    Everybody is different here depending on their philosophy. My philosophy is in commercial taxidermy that minimal rebuilding should be done. The mount isn't mean't to be viewed with a flashlight down it's throat, it's mean't to be viewed from several feet. On a warmwater skin mount on the INSIDE of the mouth I'll typically repair the hoiles in the throat from where I pegged the head. I rebuild the lips and maybe the tongue if I'm feeling like it. Teeth of course on repros. But that's about it. I believe my time could be spent better elsewhere detailing the fish where it counts. It all depends on what your target market is though and the level of quality you're putting out.

    4. What are some really important considerations when choosing what airbrush to buy?

    Simplicity, ease of use and ease of cleaning. And of course it needs to be able to do the job. I'm also a Paasche Single action guy too. I think it's the easiest to catch onto. And, I'll bet that a lot of beginners get frustrated and quit with anything more complex.

    5. What is a paint schedule and how do you come up with one?

    A paint schedule is simply a guideline to follow with the basic species. There will always be variations. I started writing down what I was doing when I first started out. I've found that for me, about three different "schedules" per species is all I need. I tweak each fish accordingly to the picture(s) I have in front of me. I don't even look at them anymore unless it's a fish I haven't done in a long time. This is where they really help.

    6. If you as a taxidermist catch a nice fish for your own collection how do you go about getting it from the water to the freezer? Tell us what you do to preserve your fish for the freezer?

    I'm not as "high-end" as some of these other folks. I usually just wrap it in a wet towel, tucking in all the fins then the fish goes in the cooler on top of ice. They must get subdued from covering their eyes and the cold as they never flop much (and can't really as that towel is tight). Once home they get wrapped in a garbage bag or two and duct taped shut, squeezing all the air out. I never catch any coldwater species though, so I don't have to worry about marks or anything from the towels on the thin-skinned fish.

    7. Have you ever looked at a mounted fish that was poorly done and said to your self that is bad taxidermy? OK we have all been there now here’s the question. If that bad fish mount was 8 or 10 dollars were inch how much more is good work worth? How do you separate the customer from paying for bad work and paying you more for better work?

    This is where a website is invaluable. People want to see things before they come if they can. A picture is worth a thousand words. if you're marketing to the higher in crowd then your work should pretty much speak for itself. Then having your prices posted on your website also helps because then you don't get all the "price shoppers".

    8. Root, Panel, or by it self… What is the most typical customer hanger for their fish?

    Driftwood, hands down. I like the Texas Tumbled Cedar. I use to charge extra for it but most people want d-wood anyway so I just built it into my new prices. Bigger fish however, I usually don't recommend d-wood and I charge a nominal fee for the bigger d-wood if a customer wants it. Personally, I prefer the solid walnut panels. They look very nice and EVERYBODY does d-wood so they're a bit different.

    9. Tell us how you set and eye? Where does the pupil go and how do you figure out the angles and the depth?

    I don't know - lol! How do you explain something like this in writing??? I just look at some good reference and pick an eye-tilt I like and replicate it. Depth-wise I usually set them in where many fish would be. Many fish have bulging eyes but I never set them like this unless the customer specifically asks for it. Looks funny to me.

    Bonus Question
    10. Is this a trout or a char? What make you think one over the other? How does this apply to your taxidermy work? See picture at the bottom of the post!

    Heck, I don't know!!! Pic is too low res to tell much. And I wouldn't be one to provide a good guess anyway because (quite frankly) I've never done or seen a Char in person - lol!!! Not a lot of demand for them around here I guess...
     
  19. Based on the new hint...I maintain that it is a Dolly Varden...my second choice in that case would have been the Bull!
    How 'bout it?
     
  20. Rick Krane

    Rick Krane Fish Taxidermist/ Judge/ Sculptor/ Instructor

    The Eastern Male Brookie! Takes it! It is great that so many can look at a photo and see a specaises in it or at least a fmauily classifaction! You guys desirve a big hand! Sorry about the picture qulity I will pic a better one for next week. I'll assure you the Reference Pictures on the Disc are out standing and in high resiltuion only. Well every one did a great job in taking a shot at it and I hope we all learned a bit more information even Cecil! Cecil was funny he went all in on this question!” I can only say what that fish pic is not: It's not in the char family “ Yes it is a Char and it is a spawning one at that! Hey you gave it a shot! Bill Fish was close and so was Ken Darville, Brain Russell Hit it right on the head but didn’t fill out the questions other than that one! LOL

    Dave Campbell’s explanation was superb! It is a distinction between trout and char because there are no teeth present on the shaft of the vomer, which is in fact the bone running down the center of the roof of the mouth. How this pertains to your taxidermy work is that when rebuilding your heads or doing some mouth work make sure that you don’t or do put teeth where they belong to each fish family!

    I do have top say I do like Marty’s Avatar! Thank you all for participating! I’ll be sending Mr. Russell a fish CD as long as he promise to fill out all the questions next week! LOL! Way to Go Brian!!!! Way to go every one! Oh BTW All of you go a good karma point form me because you participated in making taxidermy better for every one!!!!

    My Best!

    Rick Krane
    Anglers Artistry